Wednesday, January 23, 2008


Wukoki Tower

Watercolor on archival paper, 7" x 5"
$125.00 + $6.00 shipping in US.
Available for purchase starting 01/23/08, 12 noon PST

I loved exploring the high plateau country of northern Arizona. Wukoki Ruin is about 30 miles north of Flagstaff. It is settled amidst a vast, undulating plain cut by meandering dry washes. Built sometime in the 12th century by ancestral Puebloan people, the stone and mud walls look more grown than constructed-rising up out of a base of huge natural sandstone boulders. What an amazing place.

7 comments:

Suzanne said...

This could be a family portrait. There's something sacred about this composition... maybe it's the viewpoint.

d SINNER!!! said...

this one is beautiful...

Don Gray said...

Thanks, Suzanne. I'm pleased that the painting evokes those thoughts.

Don Gray said...

d sinner!!!--thanks!!!

doudy said...

Very nice view, I agree

doudy said...

Oh btw could I ask, what's a "gessoed" hardboard ?

Don Gray said...

Thanks, Doudy. True gesso was commonly used by artists of the Renaissance era as a ground, or basecoat for the wood panels they painted on. It is a mixture of chalk or whiting and an animal hide glue, usually rabbitskin.

The "gesso" usually used today is a high-grade flat acrylic paint. It is used for the same purpose, as a ground for painting on. Hardboard is made up of finely granulated wood fibers pressed under great pressure into panels, usually 1/8" or 1/4" thick. Masonite is a well-known brand name.